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    What is backdating stock cat deeley dating dominic

    Stock option backdating has erupted into a major corporate scandal, involving potentially hundreds of publicly-held companies, and may even ensnare Apple's icon, Steve Jobs.

    While the focus of the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") centers on improper accounting practices and disclosures, thereby violating securities laws, a major yet little explored consequence to the scandal involves potentially onerous taxes on those who received these options.

    Basically, a stock option is a contract right to purchase an amount of stock at a set price for a period of time.

    The author of the academic study who is credited with focusing regulators on this issue estimates that at least 10% of “at-the-money” grants of options to CEOs between 19—before Sarbanes-Oxley shortened the reporting period for option grants—were backdated.

    The reason for doing this was simple: stock options priced at or above where the stock is trading (aka, "out of the money" options) get favorable tax treatment compared to stock awards priced below the market price (aka, "in the money" options).

    It was a tax advantaged way for companies to pay executives. Shareholders were correctly told the number of options granted and the price of the options.

    If the stock increased to a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay /share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for /share, earning

    The author of the academic study who is credited with focusing regulators on this issue estimates that at least 10% of “at-the-money” grants of options to CEOs between 19—before Sarbanes-Oxley shortened the reporting period for option grants—were backdated.

    The reason for doing this was simple: stock options priced at or above where the stock is trading (aka, "out of the money" options) get favorable tax treatment compared to stock awards priced below the market price (aka, "in the money" options).

    It was a tax advantaged way for companies to pay executives. Shareholders were correctly told the number of options granted and the price of the options.

    If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).

    If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

    ||

    The author of the academic study who is credited with focusing regulators on this issue estimates that at least 10% of “at-the-money” grants of options to CEOs between 19—before Sarbanes-Oxley shortened the reporting period for option grants—were backdated.The reason for doing this was simple: stock options priced at or above where the stock is trading (aka, "out of the money" options) get favorable tax treatment compared to stock awards priced below the market price (aka, "in the money" options).It was a tax advantaged way for companies to pay executives. Shareholders were correctly told the number of options granted and the price of the options.If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

    /share in profit (

    The author of the academic study who is credited with focusing regulators on this issue estimates that at least 10% of “at-the-money” grants of options to CEOs between 19—before Sarbanes-Oxley shortened the reporting period for option grants—were backdated.

    The reason for doing this was simple: stock options priced at or above where the stock is trading (aka, "out of the money" options) get favorable tax treatment compared to stock awards priced below the market price (aka, "in the money" options).

    It was a tax advantaged way for companies to pay executives. Shareholders were correctly told the number of options granted and the price of the options.

    If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).

    If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

    ||

    The author of the academic study who is credited with focusing regulators on this issue estimates that at least 10% of “at-the-money” grants of options to CEOs between 19—before Sarbanes-Oxley shortened the reporting period for option grants—were backdated.The reason for doing this was simple: stock options priced at or above where the stock is trading (aka, "out of the money" options) get favorable tax treatment compared to stock awards priced below the market price (aka, "in the money" options).It was a tax advantaged way for companies to pay executives. Shareholders were correctly told the number of options granted and the price of the options.If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

    ,000 in total).

    If the stock dropped below /share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

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